intro

Summary:

Aesop's Fables - Visual Storytelling with Digital Illustration

    ●   Create a Animated Story using with your voice-over narration.

 

The Project Happens in 3 Parts:

Part #1: Pick a Fable ~

You will be assigned a Fable:

Summary Description

The Wolf and the Lamb

Wolf, meeting with a Lamb astray from the fold, resolved not to lay violent hands on him, but to find some plea to justify to the Lamb the Wolf's right to eat him. He thus addressed him: "Sir, last year you grossly insulted me."

"Indeed," bleated the Lamb in a mournful tone of voice, "I was not then born."

Then said the Wolf, "You feed in my pasture."

"No, good sir," replied the Lamb, "I have not yet tasted grass."

Again said the Wolf, "You drink of my well."

"No," exclaimed the Lamb, "I never yet drank water, for as yet my mother's milk is both food and drink to me."

Upon which the Wolf seized him and ate him up, saying, "Well! I won't remain supper-less, even though you refute every one of my imputations."

The tyrant will always find a pretext for his tyranny.

 

The Bat and the Weasels

A Bat who fell upon the ground and was caught by a Weasel pleaded to be spared his life. The Weasel refused, saying that he was by nature the enemy of all birds. The Bat assured him that he was not a bird, but a mouse, and thus was set free. Shortly afterwards the Bat again fell to the ground and was caught by another Weasel, whom he likewise entreated not to eat him. The Weasel said that he had a special hostility to mice. The Bat assured him that he was not a mouse, but a bat, and thus a second time escaped.

It is wise to turn circumstances to good account.

The Donkey and the Grasshopper

An Donkey having heard some Grasshoppers chirping, was highly enchanted; and, desiring to possess the same charms of melody, demanded what sort of food they lived on to give them such beautiful voices. They replied, "The dew." The Donkey resolved that he would live only upon dew, and in a short time died of hunger.

Don’t lose sight of your real needs while attempting new ventures.


The Lion and the Mouse

A Lion was awakened from sleep by a Mouse running over his face. Rising up angrily, he caught him and was about to kill him, when the Mouse piteously entreated, saying: "If you would only spare my life, I would be sure to repay your kindness." The Lion laughed and let him go.

It happened shortly after this that the Lion was caught by some hunters, who bound him by ropes. The Mouse, recognizing his roar, came gnawed the rope with his teeth, and set him free, exclaiming:

Little friends may prove great friends. Or No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.

The Wolf and the Crane

A Wolf who had a bone stuck in his throat hired a Crane, for a large sum, to put her head into his mouth and draw out the bone. When the Crane had extracted the bone and demanded the promised payment, the Wolf, grinning and grinding his teeth, exclaimed: "Why, you have surely already had a sufficient recompense, in having been permitted to draw out your head in safety from the mouth and jaws of a wolf."

In serving the wicked, expect no reward, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pains.

Hercules and the Wagoner

A carter was driving a wagon along a country lane, when the wheels sank down deep into a rut. The rustic driver, stupefied and aghast, stood looking at the wagon, and did nothing but utter loud cries to Hercules to come and help him. Hercules, it is said, appeared and thus addressed him: "Put your shoulders to the wheels, my man. Goad on your bullocks, and never more pray to me for help, until you have done your best to help yourself, or depend upon it you will henceforth pray in vain."

Self-help is the best help.

The Ants and the Grasshopper

The ants were spending a fine winter's day drying grain collected in the summertime. A Grasshopper, perishing with famine, passed by and earnestly begged for a little food. The Ants inquired of him, "Why did you not treasure up food during the summer?' He replied, "I had not leisure enough. I passed the days in singing." They then said in derision: "If you were foolish enough to sing all the summer, you must dance supperless to bed in the winter."

“Idleness brings want”   Or  "To work today is to eat tomorrow"

The Hare and the Tortoise

A Hare one day ridiculed the short feet and slow pace of the Tortoise, who replied, laughing: "Though you be swift as the wind, I will beat you in a race." The Hare, believing her assertion to be simply impossible, assented to the proposal; and they agreed that the Fox should choose the course and fix the goal. On the day appointed for the race the two started together. The Tortoise never for a moment stopped, but went on with a slow but steady pace straight to the end of the course. The Hare, lying down by the wayside, fell fast asleep. At last waking up, and moving as fast as he could, he saw the Tortoise had reached the goal, and was comfortably dozing after her fatigue.

Slow but steady wins the race.


The Farmer and the Stork

A Farmer placed nets on his newly-sown ploughlands and caught a number of Cranes, which came to pick up his seed. With them he trapped a Stork that had fractured his leg in the net and was earnestly beseeching the Farmer to spare his life. "Pray save me, Master," he said, "and let me go free this once. My broken limb should excite your pity. Besides, I am no Crane, I am a Stork, a bird of excellent character; and see how I love and slave for my father and mother. Look too, at my feathers-- they are not the least like those of a Crane." The Farmer laughed aloud and said, "It may be all as you say, I only know this: I have taken you with these robbers, the Cranes, and you must die in their company."

Birds of a feather flock together.


The Farmer and the Snake

One winter a Farmer found a Snake stiff and frozen with cold. He had compassion on it, and taking it up, placed it in his shirt. The Snake was quickly revived by the warmth, and resuming its natural instincts, bit its benefactor, inflicting on him a mortal wound. "Oh," cried the Farmer with his last breath, "I am rightly served for pitying a scoundrel."

The greatest kindness will not bind the ungrateful.

The Fawn and His Father

A young fawn once said to his Father, "You are larger than a dog, and swifter, and more used to running, and you have your horns as a defense; why, then, O Father! do the hounds frighten you so?" She smiled, and said: "I know full well, my son, that all you say is true. I have the advantages you mention, but when I hear even the bark of a single dog I feel ready to faint, and fly away as fast as I can."


No arguments will give courage to the coward


The Tortoise and the Eagle

A Tortoise, lazily basking in the sun, complained to the sea-birds of her hard fate, that no one would teach her to fly. An Eagle, hovering near, heard her lamentation and demanded what reward she would give him if he would take her aloft and float her in the air. "I will give you," she said, "all the riches of the Red Sea." "I will teach you to fly then," said the Eagle; and taking her up in his talons he carried her almost to the clouds suddenly he let her go, and she fell on a lofty mountain, dashing her shell to pieces. The Tortoise exclaimed in the moment of death: "I have deserved my present fate; for what had I to do with wings and clouds, who can with difficulty move about on the earth?'

If men had all they wished, they would be often ruined.

The Cat and the Goddess of Love

A cat fell in love with a handsome young man, and entreated Venus to change her into the form of a woman. Venus consented to her request and transformed her into a beautiful damsel, so that the youth saw her and loved her, and took her home as his bride. While the two were reclining in their chamber, Venus wishing to discover if the Cat in her change of shape had also altered her habits of life, let down a mouse in the middle of the room. The Cat, quite forgetting her present condition, started up from the couch and pursued the mouse, wishing to eat it. Venus was much disappointed and again caused her to return to her former shape.

Nature exceeds nurture.

The Flies and the Honey-Pot

A number of Flies were attracted to a jar of honey that had been overturned in a housekeeper's room, and placing their feet in it, ate greedily. Their feet, however, became so smeared with the honey that they could not use their wings, nor release themselves, and were suffocated. Just as they were expiring, they exclaimed, "O foolish creatures that we are, for the sake of a little pleasure we have destroyed ourselves."

Pleasure bought with pains, hurts.

The Farmer and the Cranes

Some cranes made their feeding grounds on some land newly sown with wheat. For a long time the Farmer, brandishing an empty sling, chased them away by the terror he inspired; but when the birds found that the sling was only swung in the air, they ceased to take any notice of it and would not move. The Farmer, on seeing this, charged his sling with stones, and killed a great number. The remaining birds at once forsook his fields, crying to each other, "It is time for us to be off  - for this man is no longer content to scare us, but begins to show us in earnest what he can do."

If words suffice not, blows must follow.

The Bear and the Two Travelers

Two men were traveling together, when a Bear suddenly met them on their path. One of them climbed up quickly into a tree and concealed himself in the branches. The other, seeing that he must be attacked, fell flat on the ground, and when the Bear came up and felt him with his snout, and smelt him all over, he held his breath, and feigned the appearance of death as much as he could. The Bear soon left him, for it is said he will not touch a dead body. When he was quite gone, the other Traveler descended from the tree, and jocularly inquired of his friend what it was the Bear had whispered in his ear. "He gave me this advice," his companion replied. "Never travel with a friend who deserts you at the approach of danger."

Misfortune tests the sincerity of friends.

The Thirsty Pigeon

A Pigeon, oppressed by excessive thirst, saw a goblet of water painted on a signboard. Not supposing it to be only a picture, she flew towards it with a loud whir and unwittingly dashed against the signboard, jarring herself terribly. Having broken her wings by the blow, she fell to the ground, and was caught by one of the bystanders.

Zeal should not outrun discretion.


The Raven and the Swan

A Raven saw a Swan and desired to secure for himself the same beautiful plumage. Supposing that the Swan's splendid white color arose from his washing in the water in which he swam, the Raven left the altars in the neighborhood where he picked up his living, and took up residence in the lakes and pools. But cleansing his feathers as often as he would, he could not change their color, while through want of food he perished.

Change of habit cannot alter Nature.


The Miser

A Miser sold all that he had and bought a lump of gold, which he buried in a hole in the ground by the side of an old wall and went to look at daily. One of his workmen observed his frequent visits to the spot and decided to watch his movements. He soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure, and digging down, came to the lump of gold, and stole it. The Miser, on his next visit, found the hole empty and began to tear his hair and to make loud lamentations. A neighbor, seeing him overcome with grief and learning the cause, said, "Pray do not grieve so; but go and take a stone, and place it in the hole, and fancy that the gold is still lying there. It will do you quite the same service; for when the gold was there, you had it not, as you did not make the slightest use of it."

Wealth unused might as well not exist

The Sick Lion

A Lion, unable from old age and infirmities to provide himself with food by force, resolved to do so by artifice. He returned to his den, and lying down there, pretended to be sick, taking care that his sickness should be publicly known. The beasts expressed their sorrow, and came one by one to his den, where the Lion devoured them. After many of the beasts had thus disappeared, the Fox discovered the trick and presenting himself to the Lion, stood on the outside of the cave, at a respectful distance, and asked him how he was. "I am very middling," replied the Lion, "but why do you stand without? Pray enter within to talk with me." "No, thank you," said the Fox. "I notice that there are many prints of feet entering your cave, but I see no trace of any returning."

He is wise who is warned by the misfortunes of others.

The Lioness

A controversy prevailed among the beasts of the field as to which of the animals deserved the most credit for producing the greatest number of whelps at a birth. They rushed clamorously into the presence of the Lioness and demanded of her the settlement of the dispute. "And you," they said, "how many sons have you at a birth?' The Lioness laughed at them, and said: "Why! I have only one; but that one is the King of the Beasts."

The value is in the worth, not in the number.

The Boy and the Candy Jar

A Boy put his hand into a jar full of candy. He grasped as many as he could possibly hold, but when he tried to pull out his hand, he was prevented from doing so by the neck of the jar. Unwilling to lose his treats, and yet unable to withdraw his hand, he burst into tears and bitterly lamented his disappointment. His mother said to him, "Be satisfied with half the quantity, and you will readily draw out your hand."

Do not attempt too much at once.  Or  Don’t bite off more than you can chew.


The Lion in Love

A Lion demanded the daughter of a woodcutter in marriage. The Father, unwilling to grant, and yet afraid to refuse his request, hit upon this expedient to rid himself of his importunities. He expressed his willingness to accept the Lion as the suitor of his daughter on one condition: that he should allow him to extract his teeth, and cut off his claws, as his daughter was fearfully afraid of both. The Lion cheerfully assented to the proposal. But when the toothless, clawless Lion returned to repeat his request, the Woodman, no longer afraid, set upon him with his club, and drove him away into the forest.

 Love can tame the wildest


The Laborer and the Snake

A Snake, having made his hole close to the porch of a house, inflicted a mortal bite on the homeowner’s infant son. Grieving over his loss, the Father resolved to kill the Snake. The next day, when it came out of its hole for food, he took up his axe, but by swinging too hastily, missed its head and cut off only the end of its tail. After some time the homeowner, afraid that the Snake would bite him also, endeavored to make peace, and placed some bread and salt in the hole. The Snake, slightly hissing, said: "There can henceforth be no peace between us; for whenever I see you I shall remember the loss of my tail, and whenever you see me you will be thinking of the death of your son."

No one truly forgets injuries in the presence of him who caused the injury.

The Wolf in Sheep's Clothing

Once upon a time a Wolf resolved to disguise his appearance in order to secure food more easily. Encased in the skin of a sheep, he pastured with the flock deceiving the shepherd by his costume. In the evening he was shut up by the shepherd in the fold; the gate was closed, and the entrance made thoroughly secure. But the shepherd, returning to the fold during the night to obtain meat for the next day, mistakenly caught up the Wolf instead of a sheep, and killed him instantly.

Harm seek. Harm find.


The Donkey and the Mule

A Muleteer set forth on a journey, driving before him an Donkey and a Mule, both well laden. The Mule, as long as he traveled along the plain, carried his load with ease, but when he began to ascend the steep path of the mountain, felt his load to be more than he could bear. He entreated his companion to relieve him of a small portion, that he might carry home the rest; but the Mule paid no attention to the request. The Donkey shortly afterwards fell down dead under his burden. Not knowing what else to do in so wild a region, the Muleteer placed upon the Mule the load carried by the Donkey in addition to his own, and at the top of all placed the hide of the Mule, after he had skinned him. The Mule, groaning beneath his heavy burden, said to himself: "I am treated according to my deserts. If I had only been willing to assist the Donkey a little in his need, I should not now be bearing, together with his burden, himself as well."

In helping others, you help yourself.

The Boys and the Frogs

Some boys, playing near a pond, saw a number of Frogs in the water and began to pelt them with stones. They killed several of them, when one of the Frogs, lifting his head out of the water, cried out: "Pray stop!” 

“What is sport to you, is death to us.”


The Oxen and the Butchers

The Oxen once upon a time sought to destroy the Butchers, who practiced a trade destructive to their race. They assembled on a certain day to carry out their purpose, and sharpened their horns for the contest. But one of them who was exceedingly old (for many a field had he plowed) thus spoke: "These Butchers, it is true, slaughter us, but they do so with skillful hands, and with no unnecessary pain. If we get rid of them, we shall fall into the hands of unskillful operators, and thus suffer a double death: for you may be assured, that though all the Butchers should perish, yet will men never want beef."

Do not be in a hurry to change one evil for another.

The Goat Herder and the Wild Goats

A Goat Herder, driving his flock from their pasture at evening, found some Wild Goats mingled among them, and shut them up together with his own for the night. The next day it snowed very hard, so that he could not take the herd to their usual feeding places, but was obliged to keep them in the fold. He gave his own goats just sufficient food to keep them alive, but fed the strangers more abundantly in the hope of enticing them to stay with him and of making them his own. When the thaw set in, he led them all out to feed, and the Wild Goats scampered away as fast as they could to the mountains. The Goatherd scolded them for their ingratitude in leaving him, when during the storm he had taken more care of them than of his own herd. One of them, turning about, said to him: "That is the very reason why we are so cautious; for if you yesterday treated us better than the Goats you have had so long, it is plain also that if others came after us, you would in the same manner prefer them to ourselves."

Old friends cannot with impunity be sacrificed for new ones.

The Mischievous Dog

A Dog used to run up quietly to the heels of everyone he met, and to bite them without notice. His master suspended a bell about his neck so that the Dog might give notice of his presence wherever he went. Thinking it a mark of distinction, the Dog grew proud of his bell and went tinkling it all over the marketplace. One day an old hound said to him: Why do you make such an exhibition of yourself? That bell that you carry is not, believe me, any order of merit, but on the contrary a mark of disgrace, a public notice to all men to avoid you as an ill mannered dog."
Notoriety is often mistaken for fame.

The Man and His Two Sweethearts

A middle-aged man, whose hair had begun to turn gray, courted two women at the same time. One of them was young, and the other well advanced in years. The elder woman, ashamed to be courted by a man younger than herself, made a point, whenever her admirer visited her, to pull out some portion of his black hairs. The younger, on the contrary, not wishing to become the wife of an old man, was equally zealous in removing every gray hair she could find. Thus it came to pass that between them both he very soon found that he had not a hair left on his head.

Those who seek to please everybody please nobody.

The Astronomer

An astronomer used to go out at night to observe the stars. One evening, as he wandered through the suburbs with his whole attention fixed on the sky, he fell accidentally into a deep well. While he lamented and bewailed his sores and bruises, and cried loudly for help, a neighbor ran to the well, and learning what had happened said: "Why, in striving to pry into what is in heaven, do you not manage to see what is on earth?'

We should never look so high as to miss seeing the things that are around us.

The Wolves and the Sheep

"Why should there always be this fear and slaughter between us?" said the Wolves to the Sheep. "Those evil-disposed Dogs have much to answer for. They always bark whenever we approach you and attack us before we have done any harm. If you would only dismiss them from your heels, there might soon be treaties of peace and reconciliation between us." The Sheep, poor silly creatures, were easily beguiled and dismissed the Dogs, whereupon the Wolves destroyed the unguarded flock at their own pleasure.

A foolish Peace is much more destructive than a bloody War.

The Roosters and the Eagle

Two roosters were fiercely fighting for the mastery of the farmyard. One at last put the other to flight. The vanquished rooster skulked away and hid himself in a quiet corner, while the conqueror, flying up to a high wall, flapped his wings and crowed exultingly with all his might. An Eagle sailing through the air pounced upon him and carried him off in his talons. The vanquished rooster immediately came out of his corner, and ruled henceforth with undisputed mastery.

Pride goes before a fall.

The Stag at the Pool

 

A Stag overpowered by heat came to a spring to drink. Seeing his own shadow reflected in the water, he greatly admired the size and variety of his horns, but felt angry with himself for having such slender and weak feet. While he was thus contemplating himself, a Lion appeared at the pool and crouched to spring upon him. The Stag immediately took to flight, and exerting his utmost speed, as long as the plain was smooth and open kept himself easily at a safe distance from the Lion. But entering a wood he became entangled by his horns, and the Lion quickly came up to him and caught him. When too late, he thus reproached himself: “Woe is me! How I have deceived myself! These feet which would have saved me I despised, and I gloried in these antlers which have proved my destruction.”

 

What is most truly valuable is often underrated.

The Donkey and his Purchaser

 

A man wished to purchase a Donkey, and agreed with its owner that he should try out the animal before he bought him. He took the Donkey home and put him in the straw-yard with his other Donkies, upon which the new animal left all the others and at once joined the one that was most idle and the greatest eater of them all. Seeing this, the man put a halter on him and led him back to his owner. On being asked how, in so short a time, he could have made a trial of him, he answered, “I do not need a trial; I know that he will be just the same as the one he chose for his companion.”

A man is known by the company he keeps.

The Lark Burying her Father

 

The Lark (according to an ancient legend) was created before the earth itself, and when her father died, as there was no earth, she could find no place of burial for him. She let him lie uninterred for five days, and on the sixth day, not knowing what else to do, she buried him in her own head. Hence she obtained her crest, which is popularly said to be her father’s grave-hillock.

Youth’s first duty is reverence to parents.

The Boy who Cried Wolf

A Shepherd-boy, who watched a flock of sheep near a village, brought out the villagers three or four times by crying out, "Wolf! Wolf!" and when his neighbors came to help him, laughed at them for their pains. The Wolf, however, did truly come at last. The Shepherd-boy, now really alarmed, shouted in an agony of terror: "Pray, do come and help me; the Wolf is killing the sheep"; but no one paid any heed to his cries, nor rendered any assistance. The Wolf, having no cause of fear, at his leisure lacerated or destroyed the whole flock.

There is no believing a liar, even when he speaks the truth.

The Gnat and the Bull

A huge bull stood grazing in the field. A tiny Gnat flew over the meadow with much buzzing for so small a creature and settled on the tip of one of the horns of a Bull.  Just as he was about to fly off, he made a buzzing noise, and said, "Dear bull, pardon me if I have disturbed your peaceful afternoon with the weight of my body on your horns. I offer you a thousand apologies  . . . I wouldn't want you to think I didn't care about your solitude and comfort."

The Bull replied, “I did not know you had come, and I shall not miss you when you go away.”

Some men are of more consequence in their own eyes than in the eyes of their neighbors.

The Wolf, The Fox and the Ape

A Wolf accused a Fox of theft, but the Fox entirely denied the charge. An Ape undertook to adjudge the matter between them. When each had fully stated his case the Ape announced this sentence: “I do not think you, Wolf, ever lost what you claim; and I do believe you, Fox, to have stolen what you so stoutly deny.”

The dishonest, even if they act honestly, get no credit.

The Kid and the Wolf

A Kid standing on the roof of a house, out of harm's way, saw a Wolf passing by and immediately began to taunt and revile him. The Wolf, looking up, said, "Sir! I hear thee: yet it is not thou who mockest me, but the roof on which thou art standing."

Time and place often give the advantage to the weak over the strong.

The Dove and the Crow

 

A DOVE shut up in a cage was boasting of the large number of young ones which she had hatched. A Crow, hearing her, said: My good friend, cease from this unreasonable boasting. The larger the number of your family, the greater your cause of sorrow, in seeing them shut up in this prison-house.

 

To enjoy our blessings, we must have freedom.

The Donkey, the Fox, & the Lion

A Donkey and a Fox had become close comrades, and were constantly in each other's company. While the Donkey cropped a fresh bit of greens, the Fox would devour a chicken from the neighboring farmyard or a bit of cheese filched from the dairy. One day the pair unexpectedly met a Lion. The Donkey was very much frightened, but the Fox calmed his fears.

"I will talk to him," he said.

So the Fox walked boldly up to the Lion.

"Your highness," he said in an undertone, so the Donkey could not hear him, "I've got a fine scheme in my head. If you promise not to hurt me, I will lead that foolish creature yonder into a pit where he can't get out, and you can feast at your pleasure."

The Lion agreed and the Fox returned to the Ass.

"I made him promise not to hurt us," said the Fox. "But come, I know a good place to hide till he is gone."

So the Fox led the Donkey into a deep pit. But when the Lion saw that the Donkey was his for the taking, he first of all struck down the traitor Fox.

Traitors may expect treachery.

The Boy Swimming

A boy swimming in a river was in danger of being drowned. He called out to a passing traveler for help, but instead of holding out a helping hand, the man stood by unconcernedly, and scolded the boy for his imprudence. “Oh, sir!” cried the youth, “pray help me now and scold me afterwards.”

 

Advice without help is useless.

The Murderer

A man committed a murder, and was pursued by the family of the man whom he murdered. On his reaching the river Nile he saw a Lion on its bank and being fearfully afraid, climbed up a tree. He found a serpent in the upper branches of the tree, and again being greatly alarmed, he threw himself into the river, where a crocodile caught him and ate him.

The earth, the air, and the water alike refuse shelter to a murderer

 

The Hen and the Swallow

A HEN finding the eggs of a viper, and carefully keeping them warm, nourished them into life. A Swallow, observing what she had done, said: You silly creature! Why have you hatched these vipers, which, when they shall have grown, will surely inflict injury on all of us, beginning with yourself?


If we nourish evil, it will sooner or later turn upon us.

 

The Truth and the Traveler

A Traveler, traveling in the desert, met a woman standing alone and terribly dejected.  He inquired of her, “Who art thou?” “My name is Truth,” she replied. “And for what cause,” he asked, “have you left the city to dwell alone here in the wilderness?” She made answer, “Because in former times, falsehood was with few, but is now with all men.” < /p>

Truth is the cry of all, but the game of the few.

 

The Scorpion and the Frog

  A scorpion and a frog met at the edge of a stream and the scorpion asked the frog to carry him across on its back, because scorpions cannot swim.

The frog replied, "How do I know you won't sting me?"

"Because if I sting you, you would sink and we would both die."

The frog thus satisfied set out, but in midstream, the scorpion does indeed sting the frog, and as they both begin to drown the frogs last words were: "Why?"

The scorpion replied, "It is in my nature..."

Form Follows Function

 

The Trees Under the Protection of the Gods

The Gods, according to an ancient legend, made choice of certain trees to be under their special protection. Jupiter chose the oak, Venus the myrtle, Apollo the laurel, Cybele the pine, and Hercules the poplar. Minerva, wondering why they had preferred trees not yielding fruit, inquired the reason for their choice. Jupiter replied, “It is lest we should seem to covet the honor for the fruit.” But said Minerva, “Let anyone say what he will the olive is more dear to me on account of its fruit.”

Then said Jupiter, “My daughter, you are rightly called wise; for unless what we do is useful, the glory of it is vain.”


The Stomach and the Limbs

The Limbs of the Body rebelled against the Stomach, saying, "Why should we be perpetually engaged in administering to your wants, while you do nothing but enjoy yourself in luxury and self-indulgence?' The Limbs carried out their resolve and refused their assistance to the Stomach. The whole Body quickly became debilitated, and the hands, feet, mouth, and eyes, when too late, repented of their folly.

All must work together or the Whole will go to pieces. 

Part #2: Create A Storyboard ~

Design Always Begins with Paper and Pencil

  •  Students are assigned one of Aesop's Fables.

  •  It's better to assign the fables because students waste time choosing their own.

  •  Then create a Storyboard - a sequence of pictures arranged to represent the events of the story in the order they will occur.

  •  The storyboard is a big part of the first week of the project. The storyboard serves as a reference point for the rest of the project.


Part #3: Move to the Computer ~

hercules-wagoner.swf

Render your Images with Software

•   Present your work to the class!

• The great thing about Flash is students can make it as complicated or simple as they want.

• Ambitious users can use the powerful animation features of Flash, but it's not required.


 

Scan your Sketch into the Computer

  •   Scan your drawing and open it.

  •   Or, you can go to Google Images and find things that resemble your prototype drawings, whatever you need - get it.  

  •   Then begin outlining everything with the tools that you will be introduced to during the course of this project.

  •   Create all the characters, backgrounds, text - everything you need to tell the story.

 

Digital Art and Design

ALL work must be an original creation!


YES, you can trace copied images from the internet but the end result must be modified by at least 90%, meaning that the color, size and name should be changed to be unrecognizable from the original content.


NEVER plagiarize or pass off other peoples ideas as your own.


Aesop's Fables Examples:

These are examples created by students following the Aesop's Fables project.

          wolf-and-crane   Link               v          the bear   the sick lion           Example                   Link

Aesop's Fables: Day 1 ~

New Project Begins Today  ~  

Introduce this PBL project by reading this Entry Document with the Class.

Project Reflection Journal - Attach your previous project to your portfolio and reflect upon what you have learned. 

Search Aesop's Fables and pick a story or look here for more options

Start on this

Begin Sketching your Ideas! Create a storyboard by doing this.


Aesop's Fables: Day 2 ~

"He is wise who is warned by the misfortunes of others."  ~  The Sick Lion

Daily Journal - Explain This Project - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt. ~OR~

Daily Journal - What is a Storyboard? - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Finish this tutorial from yesterday …

Continue your storyboard

WORKSHOP - What is a Storyboard? What's it used for? When's it Due?


Aesop's Fables: Day 3 ~

“Nature exceeds nurture.”  ~  The Cat And Venus

Journal - Another Storyboard Journal - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial - Coloring with the Paint Bucket - Attach by Due Date.

Continue your storyboard … Due in 2 Days …

WORKSHOP - Storyboard Rubric Review - Why do you have to use Aesop's Original Language? Why do you have to Color it? How much is the Storyboard worth? What about this example? Why do I need a Moral?


Aesop's Fables: Day 4 ~

"SELF-HELP IS THE BEST HELP " ~ Hercules and the Wagoner    ~  

Journal - Conflict! - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial - Highlights and Shadows - Attach by Due Date.

Continue your StoryboardDue Tomorrow!

WORKSHOP - Storyboard Rubric Review - Why do you have to use Aesop's Original Language? Why do you have to Color it? How much is the Storyboard worth? What about this example? Why do I need a Moral?


Aesop's Fables: Day 5 ~

"If men had all they wished, they would be often ruined." ~ Tortoise/Eagle 

Journal - Moral? Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt … ~OR~

Journal - Name 3 things that Flash and Photoshop have in Common - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Create a Snowman in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Background Gradients and Text - Attach by Due Date.

Finish your Storyboard - DUE TODAY!

WORKSHOP - 4 Things Every Flash User Should Know! What things do Flash and Photoshop have in Common? Answer = Lots!


Aesop's Fables: Day 6 ~

Week 2 

Journal - View this Aesop example and comment - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt … ~OR~

Journal - Plot - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Background Gradients and Text - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Background BitMaps - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Scens and Stop Commands


Aesop's Fables: Day 7 ~

"It is wise to turn circumstances to good account." ~ The Bat and the Weasels

Journal - What is the Moral of this story? - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Scenes and Stop Commands - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Trace Bitmap - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Workshop: Stop Commands

Try this if you Dare! - Bounce a Ball in Flash


Aesop's Fables: Day 8 ~

"The dishonest, if they act honestly, get no credit." ~ The Wolf, Fox & Ape

Journal - What Motivates your Character? Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Background into Bitmaps - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Rastor vs. Vector - Final Exam Question?

Try this if you Dare! - Beating Hearts


Aesop's Fables: Day 9 ~

"Counsel without help is useless." ~ The Boy Bathing

Journal - Raster vs. Vector Journal - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt. ~OR~

Journal - Knowlege and Thinking Skills Journal - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial - Circular Spheres - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Trace Bitmap - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Rastor vs. Vector - Final Exam Question?

Try This if you DARE! - Rotating Star


Aesop's Fables: Day 10 ~

"Nature exceeds nurture." ~ The Cat and Venus

Journal - Was the artist successful in their intent? - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Rotating Star - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Rastor vs. Vector - Final Exam Question?

Try this if you DARE! - Handwriting



Aesop's Fables: Day 11 ~

"We had better bear our troubles bravely than try to escape them." ~ The King's Son

Journal - Consecutive Elements - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Text Boxes - Attach by Due Date.

Continue Working on your Scenes

Try this if you Dare! - Shape Tween


Aesop's Fables: Day 12 ~

"We had better bear our troubles bravely than try to escape them." ~ The King's Son

Journal - Plot-Story - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Exploding Text in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Trace Bitmap - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #3 - Bounce and Jump in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Add Pauses to your scenes …

Try this if you Dare! - Exploding Text

  •   workshop - Pauses.


Aesop's Fables: Day 13 ~

"Try before you trust." ~ The Lion and the Eagle

Journal - View This Example - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt. ~OR~

Journal - Language from the Original Text Journal - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Pow! Wham! Zap! - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Typewriter Text Effect in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #3 - Bounce and Jump in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Add Pauses to your scenes …

WORKSHOP - Import your mp3 recording into the Library.

Try this if you Dare! - Clouds


Aesop's Fables: Day 14 ~

"Self-interest alone moves some men." ~ The Peasant and the Apple Tree

Journal - What is the end of your story? - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt …

Tutorial #1 - Invisible Buttons - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Typewriter Text Effect in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #3 - Bounce and Jump in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Pauses

Try this if you Dare! - Butterfly.


Aesop's Fables: Day 15 ~

"It is absurd to ape our betters." ~ The Monkey and the Camel

Journal - Invisible Buttons - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt … ~OR~

Journal - View This Example - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Typewriter Text Effect in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Blur Backgrounds - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #3 - Bounce and Jump in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Every Scene should have an Animation on it According the the Rubric!

Try this if you Dare! - Rainbow Masks.



Aesop's Fables: Day 16 ~

"Attempt not impossibilities." ~ The Dogs and the Hides

Journal - Pick the Most Significant thing - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Walking Animation in Fl- Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Rotate Shadow in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #3 - Bounce and Jump in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Continue Working on your Scenes - DUE IN 4 DAYS!


Aesop's Fables: Day 17 ~

"What is most truly valuable is often underrated." ~ The Stag at the Pool

Journal - How do you Feel About it Now? - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt. ~ OR ~

Daily Journal - Conflict - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Lines in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Tree in Fl - Attach by Due Date.

WORKSHOP - Every Scene should have an Animation on it according the the Rubric!

Try this if you Dare! - Shape Tweens …


Aesop's Fables: Day 18 ~

"Youth’s first duty is reverence to parents." ~ The Lark Burying her Father

Journal - Music and Sound - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt. ~ OR ~

Daily Journal - Conflict - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Add Music To your composition - Attach by Due Date.

Tutorial #2 - Cactus in Flash - Attach by Due Date.

Try this if you Dare! - Flower Power …

Project Due in 2 Days - Get to Work!


Aesop's Fables: Day 19 ~

"Some men are of more consequence in their own eyes than in the eyes of their neighbors." ~ The Gnat and the Bull

Journal - Name 1 thing you don't like - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Simple Animation in Flash - Attach by Due Date.

Try this if you Dare! - Stretchy Text …

Project Due Tomorrow -


Aesop's Fables: Day 20 ~

"To enjoy our blessings, we must have freedom." ~ The Dove and the Crow

Journal - List the most important characteristics - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Record your voice to add Spoken Dialogue to your story.

Project Due NOW - Attach by the end of the period.



Aesop's Fables: Day 21 ~

"To enjoy our blessings, we must have freedom." ~ The Dove and the Crow

Journal - Photoshop-Illustrator-Flash - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Record your voice to add Spoken Dialogue to your story.

Project Due NOW - Attach by the end of the period.

 


Aesop's Fables: Day 22 ~

"To enjoy our blessings, we must have freedom." ~ The Dove and the Crow

Journal - Compare and Contrast These Two Works - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial #1 - Rainbow Mask in Flash - Attach by Due Date.

Record your voice to add Spoken Dialogue to your story.

Project Due NOW - Attach by the end of the period.

 


Aesop's Fables: Day 23 ~

"SELF-HELP IS THE BEST HELP " ~ Hercules and the Wagoner    ~  

Journal - Compare and Contrast these two stories - Begin class with this warm-up writing prompt.

Tutorial - Shape Tween - Attach by Due Date.

Record your voice to add Spoken Dialogue to your story.

Project Due NOW - Attach by the end of the period.